Tue, 12 Oct 2010

16:00 - 17:00
DH 3rd floor SR

Random Walks: Getting from A to A.

David Hume
(Oxford University)
Abstract

This talk introduces the topic of random walks on a finitely generated group and asks what properties of such a group can be detected through knowledge of such walks.

Thu, 07 May 2009
11:00
DH 3rd floor SR

Bayesian Gaussian Process models for multi-sensor time-series prediction

Michael Osborne
(Oxford University)
Abstract
We propose a powerful prediction algorithm built upon Gaussian
processes (GPs). They are particularly useful for their flexibility,
facilitating accurate prediction even in the absence of strong physical models. GPs further allow us to work within a completely Bayesian framework. As such, we show how the hyperparameters of our system can be marginalised by use of Bayesian Monte Carlo, a principled method of approximate integration. We employ the error bars of the GP's prediction as a means to select only the most informative observations to store. This allows us to introduce an iterative formulation of the GP to give a dynamic, on-line algorithm. We also show how our error bars can be used to perform active data selection, allowing the GP to select where and when it should next take a measurement.

We demonstrate how our methods can be applied to multi-sensor prediction problems where data may be missing, delayed and/or correlated. In particular, we present a real network of weather sensors as a testbed for our algorithm.

Fri, 30 Jan 2009

16:30 - 17:00
DH 3rd floor SR

Modelling the Circulatory System: Evaluating Arterial Pressure and Cardiac Output

Athanasios Tsanas
(Oxford University)
Abstract
The circulatory system is the most important and amongst the most complicated mechanisms in the human body. Consisting of the heart, the arteries and the veins, it is amply aided by a variety of mechanisms aiming to facilitate adequate perfusion of the body tissues at the appropriate pressure. On this talk I am focusing on the development of a computational model which relates patient specific factors (age, gender, whether someone is an athlete/smokes etc) and their effects on different vascular regions which ultimately determine the arterial pressure and the cardiac output.
Thu, 08 Nov 2007

11:00 - 12:00
DH 3rd floor SR

OxMOS lecture - Bifurcation Theory III

Carlos Mora-Corral
(Oxford University)
Abstract
Introduction to the topological degree: Existence and Uniqueness of the Brouwer degree, Existence and Uniqueness of the Leray-Schauder degree.
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