Mon, 13 Jun 2022
14:15
L5

Open FJRW theory

Mark Gross
(Cambridge)
Abstract

I will describe joint work with Tyler Kelly and Ran Tessler. FJRW (Fan-Jarvis-Ruan-Witten) theory is an enumerative theory of quasi-homogeneous singularities, or alternatively, of Landau-Ginzburg models. It associates to a potential W:C^n -> C given by a quasi-homogeneous polynomial moduli spaces of (orbi-)curves of some genus and marked points along with some extra structure, and these moduli spaces carry virtual fundamental classes as constructed by Fan-Jarvis-Ruan. Here we specialize to the case W=x^r+y^s and construct an analogous enumerative theory for disks. We show that these open invariants provide perturbations of the potential W in such a way that mirror symmetry becomes manifest. Further, these invariants are dependent on certain choices of boundary conditions, but satisfy a beautiful wall-crossing formalism.

Mon, 16 May 2022
14:15
L5

Morava K-theory and Hamiltonian loops

Ivan Smith
(Cambridge)
Abstract

A loop of Hamiltonian diffeomorphisms of a symplectic manifold $X$ defines, by clutching, a symplectic fibration over the two-sphere with fibre $X$.  We prove that the integral cohomology of the total space splits additively, answering a question of McDuff, and extending the rational cohomology analogue proved by Lalonde-McDuff-Polterovich in the late 1990’s. The proof uses a virtual fundamental class of moduli spaces of sections of the fibration in Morava K-theory. This talk reports on joint work with Mohammed Abouzaid and Mark McLean.

Tue, 08 Feb 2022
14:00
Virtual

Large hypergraphs without tight cycles

Barnabas Janzer
(Cambridge)
Abstract

An $r$-uniform tight cycle of length $k>r$ is a hypergraph with vertices $v_1,\ldots,v_k$ and edges $\{v_i,v_{i+1},…,v_{i+r-1}\}$ (for all $i$), with the indices taken modulo $k$. Sós, and independently Verstraëte, asked the following question: how many edges can there be in an $n$-vertex $r$-uniform hypergraph if it contains no tight cycles of any length? In this talk I will review some known results, and present recent progress on this problem.

Tue, 25 Jan 2022
14:00
Virtual

Induced Poset Saturation

Maria-Romina Ivan
(Cambridge)
Abstract

Given a fixed poset $\mathcal P$, we say that a family $\mathcal F$ of subsets of $[n]$ is $\mathcal P$-free if it does not contain an (induced) copy of $\mathcal P$. And we say that $F$ is $\mathcal P$-saturated if it is maximal $\mathcal P$-free. How small can a $\mathcal P$-saturated family be? The smallest such size is the induced saturation number of $\mathcal P$, $\text{sat}^*(n, \mathcal P)$. Even for very small posets, the question of the growth speed of $\text{sat}^*(n,\mathcal P)$ seems to be hard. We present background on this problem and some recent results.

Tue, 03 May 2022

14:00 - 15:00
L6

Equivariant line bundles with connection on the Drinfeld upper half-space

Amy Zhu
(Cambridge)
Abstract

Ardakov and Wadsley developed a theory of D-modules on rigid analytic spaces and established a Beilinson-Bernstein style localisation theorem for coadmissible modules over the locally analytic distribution algebra. Using this theory, they obtained admissible locally analytic representations of SL_2 by taking global sections of Drinfeld line bundles. In this talk, we will extend their techniques to SL_3 by studying the Drinfeld upper half-space \Omega^{(3)} of dimension 2.

Fri, 05 Nov 2021

14:00 - 15:00
L6

Carbon capture and storage in layered porous reservoirs

Graham Benham
(Cambridge)
Abstract

The injection of CO2 into porous subsurface reservoirs is a technological means for removing anthropogenic emissions, which relies on a series of complex porous flow properties. During injection of CO2 small-scale heterogeneities, often in the form of sedimentary layering, can play a significant role in focusing the flow of less viscous CO2 into high permeability pathways, with large-scale implications for the overall motion of the CO2 plume. In these settings, capillary forces between the CO2 and water preferentially rearrange CO2 into the most permeable layers (with larger pore space), and may accelerate plume migration by as much as 200%. Numerous factors affect overall plume acceleration, including the structure of the layering, the permeability contrast between layers, and the playoff between the capillary, gravitational and viscous forces that act upon the flow. However, despite the sensitivity of the flow to these heterogeneities, it is difficult to acquire detailed field measurements of the heterogeneities owing to the vast range of scales involved, presenting an outstanding challenge. As a first step towards tackling this uncertainty, we use a simple modelling approach, based on an upscaled thin-film equation, to create ensemble forecasts for many different types and arrangements of sedimentary layers. In this way, a suite of predictions can be made to elucidate the most likely scenarios for injection and the uncertainty associated with such predictions. 

Tue, 19 Oct 2021
12:00
L5

Why Null Infinity Is Not Smooth, and How to Measure Its Non-smoothness

Leonhard Kehrberger
(Cambridge)
Abstract

Penrose's proposal of smooth conformal compactification is not only of geometric elegance, it also makes concrete predictions on physically measurable objects such as the "late-time tails" of gravitational waves.  At the same time, the physical motivation for a smooth null infinity remains itself unclear. In this talk, building on arguments due to Christodoulou, Damour and others, I will show that, in generic gravitational collapse, the "peeling property" of gravitational radiation is violated (so one cannot attach a smooth null infinity). Moreover, I will explain how this violation of peeling is in principle measurable in the form of leading-order deviations from the usual late-time tails of gravitational radiation.

This talk is based on https://arxiv.org/abs/2105.08079https://arxiv.org/abs/2105.08084 and https://arxiv.org/abs/2106.00035 .

It will be a hybrid seminar on both zoom and in-person in L5. 

Mon, 01 Nov 2021
14:15
L4

Stability conditions for polarised varieties

Ruadhaí Dervan
(Cambridge)
Abstract

A central theme of complex geometry is the relationship between differential-geometric PDEs and algebro-geometric notions of stability. Examples include Hermitian Yang-Mills connections and Kähler-Einstein metrics on the PDE side, and slope stability and K-stability on the algebro-geometric side. I will describe a general framework associating geometric PDEs on complex manifolds to notions of stability, and will sketch a proof showing that existence of solutions is equivalent to stability in a model case. The framework can be seen as an analogue in the setting of varieties of Bridgeland's stability conditions on triangulated categories.

Thu, 06 May 2021

12:00 - 13:30
Virtual

Bio-Inspired Noise Control

Lorna Ayton
(Cambridge)
Abstract

Noise is generated in an aerodynamic setting when flow turbulence encounters a structural edge, such as at the sharp trailing edge of an aerofoil. The generation of this noise is unavoidable, however this talk addresses various ways in which it may be mitigated through altering the design of the edge. The alterations are inspired by natural silent fliers: owls. A short review of how trailing-edge noise is modelled will be given, followed by a discussion of two independent adaptations; serrations, and porosity. The mathematical impacts of the adaptations to the basic trailing-edge model will be presented, along with the physical implications they have on noise generation and control.

Fri, 12 Mar 2021
16:00
Virtual

Boundaries, Factorisation & Mirror Duality

Daniel Zhang
(Cambridge)
Abstract

I will review recent work on N=(2,2) boundary conditions of 3d
N=4 theories which mimic isolated massive vacua at infinity. Subsets of
local operators supported on these boundary conditions form lowest
weight Verma modules over the quantised bulk Higgs and Coulomb branch
chiral rings. The equivariant supersymmetric Casimir energy is shown to
encode the boundary ’t Hooft anomaly, and plays the role of lowest
weights in these modules. I will focus on a key observable associated to
these boundary conditions; the hemisphere partition function, and apply
them to the holomorphic factorisation of closed 3-manifold partition
functions and indices. This yields new “IR formulae” for partition
functions on closed 3-manifolds in terms of Verma characters. I will
also discuss ongoing work on connections to enumerative geometry, and
the construction of elliptic stable envelopes of Aganagic and Okounkov,
in particular their physical manifestation via mirror duality
interfaces.

This talk is based on 2010.09741 and ongoing work with Mathew Bullimore
and Samuel Crew.

Subscribe to Cambridge