Fridays@4

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
Tomorrow
16:00
Candy Bowtell and Luci Basualdo Bonatto
Abstract

In this session we will host a Q&A with current researchers who have recently gone through successful applications as well as more senior staff who have been on interview panels and hiring committees for postdoctoral positions in mathematics. The session will be a chance to get varied perspectives on the application process and find out about the different types of academic positions to apply for.

The panel members will be Candy Bowtell, Luci Basualdo Bonatto, Mohit Dalwadi, Ben Fehrman and Frances Kirwan. 

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

28 May 2021
16:00
Clemens Koppensteiner and David Gómez-Castro
Abstract

Aggregation-Diffusion Equations
David Gómez-Castro

The aim of this talk is to discuss an evolution problem modelling particles systems exhibiting aggregation and diffusion phenomena, and we will focus mostly on the so-called Aggregation-Diffusion Equation: ∂ρ ∂t = ∇ · (ρ ∇(U′ (ρ) + V + W ∗ ρ)) (ADE)

First, we will discuss the modelling. The famous case U′ (ρ) = log ρ and W = 0 is the famous Heat Equation. In the classical literature, the term U′(ρ) is typically deduced from Darcy’s law and models an internal energy of the system. We will show through particle systems how the term V models a confinement energy and W ∗ ρ an aggregation energy. The complete model covers many famous examples from different disciplines: Porous Media, Fokker-Plank, Keller-Segel and others. After this modelling, we discuss the mathematical treatment of (ADE). As in the case of the Heat Equation, the diffusion cases where W = V = 0 are typically studied in the Lebesgue and Sobolev spaces. However, as in the Keller-Segel problem, a Dirac measures may appear in finite time. We present the Wasserstein distance between measures, which is a natural framework for these equations, connecting with the theory of Optimal Transport. In fact, when U, V and W are convex, (ADE) can be studied as the gradient-flow of a free-energy functional (i.e. curves minimising this energy) in this Wasserstein distance, applying Calculus of Variations techniques. We will discuss the minimisation problem associated to F, with an interest to the existence of Dirac measures. Finally, we will present new results showing that indeed, in some cases besides Keller-Segel, states with a Delta can be achieved through solutions of the evolution problem

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

11 June 2021
16:00
Jaclyn Lang and Jan Sbierski
Abstract

Jan Sbierski

The strength of singularities in general relativity

One of the many curious features of Einstein’s theory of general relativity is that the theory predicts its own breakdown at so-called gravitational singularities. The gravitational field in general relativity is modelled by a Lorentzian manifold — and thus a gravitational singularity is signalled by the geometry of the Lorentzian manifold becoming singular. In this talk I will first review the classical definition of a gravitational singularity along with a classification of their strengths. I will conclude with outlining newly developed techniques which capture the singularity at the level of the connection of Lorentzian manifolds.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

18 June 2021
16:00
Helena Webb
Abstract

How aware should we be of letting AI make decisions on prison sentences? Or what is our responsibility in ensuring that mathematics does not predict another global stock crash?

In this talk, Helena will outline how we can view ethics and responsibility as central to processes of innovation and describe her experiences applying this perspective to teaching in the Department of Computer Science. There will be a chance to open up discussion about how this same approach can be applied in other Departments here in Oxford.

Helena is an interdisciplinary researcher working in the Department of Computer Science. She works on projects that involve examining the social impacts of computer-based innovations and identifying the ways in which these innovations can better meet societal needs and empower users. Helena is very passionate about the need to embed ethics and responsibility into processes of learning and research in order to foster technologies for the social good.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

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