Applied Topology Seminar

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
4 December 2020
15:00
Abstract

Research on robot manipulation has focused, in recent years, on grasping everyday objects, with target objects almost exclusively rigid items. Non–rigid objects, as textile ones, pose many additional challenges with respect to rigid object manipulation. In this seminar we will present how we can employ topology to study the ``state'' of a rectangular textile using the configuration space of $n$ points on the plane. Using a CW-decomposition of such space, we can define for any mesh associated with a rectangular textile a vector in an euclidean space with as many dimensions as the number of regions we have defined. This allows us to study the distribution of such points on the cloth and define meaningful states for detection and manipulation planning of textiles. We will explain how such regions can be defined and computationally how we can assign to any mesh the corresponding region. If time permits, we will also explain how the CW-structure allows us to define more than just euclidean distance between such mesh-distributions.

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  • Applied Topology Seminar
29 January 2021
15:00
Abstract

Ollivier Ricci curvature is a notion originated from Riemannian Geometry and suitable for applying on different settings from smooth manifolds to discrete structures such as (directed) hypergraphs. In the past few years, alongside Forman Ricci curvature, this curvature as an edge based measure, has become a popular and powerful tool for network analysis. This notion is defined based on optimal transport problem (Wasserstein distance) between sets of probability measures supported on data points and can nicely detect some important features such as clustering and sparsity in their structures. After introducing this notion for (directed) hypergraphs and mentioning some of its properties, as one of the main recent applications, I will present the result of implementation of this tool for the analysis of chemical reaction networks. 

  • Applied Topology Seminar
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