Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
21 January 2021
12:00
to
13:30
Cameron Hall
Abstract

Contagion models on networks can be used to describe the spread of information, rumours, opinions, and (more topically) diseases through a population. In the simplest contagion models, each node represents an individual that can be in one of a number of states (e.g. Susceptible, Infected, or Recovered), and the states of the nodes evolve according to specified rules. Even with simple Markovian models of transmission and recovery, it can be difficult to compute the dynamics of contagion on large networks: running simulations can be slow, and the system of master equations is typically too large to be tractable.

 One approach to approximating contagion dynamics is to assume that each node state is independent of the neighbouring node states; this leads to a system of ODEs for the node state probabilities (the “first-order approximation”) that always overestimates the speed of infection spread. This approach can be made more sophisticated by introducing pair approximations or higher-order moment closures, but this dramatically increases the size of the system and slows computations. In this talk, I will present some alternative node-based approximations for contagion dynamics. The first of these is exact on trees but will always underestimate the speed of infection spread on a network with loops. I will show how this can be combined with the classic first-order node-based approximation to obtain a node-based approximation that has similar accuracy to the pair approximation, but which is considerably faster to solve.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
28 January 2021
12:00
Elisabeth Guazzelli

Further Information: 

We continue this term with our flagship seminars given by notable scientists on topics that are relevant to Industrial and Applied Mathematics. 

Note the new time of 12:00-13:00 on Thursdays.

This will give an opportunity for the entire community to attend and for speakers with childcare responsibilities to present.

Abstract

Suspensions are composed of mixtures of particles and fluid and are
ubiquitous in industrial processes (e.g. waste disposal, concrete,
drilling muds, metalworking chip transport, and food processing) and in
natural phenomena (e.g. flows of slurries, debris, and lava). The
present talk focusses on the rheology of concentrated suspensions of
non-colloidal particles. It addresses the classical shear viscosity of
suspensions but also non-Newtonian behaviour such as normal-stress
differences and shear-induced migration. The rheology of dense
suspensions can be tackled via a diversity of approaches that are
introduced. In particular, the rheometry of suspensions can be
undertaken at an imposed volume fraction but also at imposed values of
particle normal stress, which is particularly well suited to yield
examination of the rheology close to the jamming transition. The
influences of particle roughness and shape are discussed.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
18 February 2021
12:00
Professor Ruth Baker

Further Information: 

We continue this term with our flagship seminars given by notable scientists on topics that are relevant to Industrial and Applied Mathematics. 

Note the new time of 12:00-13:00 on Thursdays.

This will give an opportunity for the entire community to attend and for speakers with childcare responsibilities to present.

Abstract

Simple mathematical models have had remarkable successes in biology, framing how we understand a host of mechanisms and processes. However, with the advent of a host of new experimental technologies, the last ten years has seen an explosion in the amount and types of quantitative data now being generated. This sets a new challenge for the field – to develop, calibrate and analyse new, biologically realistic models to interpret these data. In this talk I will showcase how quantitative comparisons between models and data can help tease apart subtle details of biological mechanisms, as well as present some steps we have taken to tackle the mathematical challenges in developing models that are both identifiable and can be efficiently calibrated to quantitative data.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
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