Past Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar

18 June 2020
16:00
Professor Dominic Vella

Further Information: 

This term's IAM seminar, a bi-weekly series entitled, 'OCIAM learns about ...' will involve internal speakers giving a general introduction to a topic on which they are experts.

Join the seminar in Zoom

[Meeting URL removed for security reasons]
 Meeting ID: 917 3329 6449Password: 329856One 

Abstract


This week Professor Dominic Vella will talk about wrinkling  

In this talk I will provide an overview of recent work on the wrinkling of thin elastic objects. In particular, the focus of the talk will be on answering questions that arise in recent applications that seek not to avoid, but rather, exploit wrinkling. Such applications usually take place far beyond the threshold of instability and so key themes will be the limitations of “standard” instability analysis, as well as what analysis should be performed instead. I will discuss the essential ingredients of this ‘Far-from-Threshold’ analysis, as well as outlining some open questions.  

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
4 June 2020
16:00
Professor Ian Hewitt

Further Information: 

A new bi-weekly seminar series, 'OCIAM learns ..."

Internal speakers give a general introduction to a topic on which they are experts.

Abstract

Abstract

This talk will provide an overview of mathematical modelling applied to the behaviour of ice sheets and their role in the climate system.  I’ll provide some motivation and background, describe simple approaches to modelling the evolution of the ice sheets as a fluid-flow problem, and discuss some particular aspects of the problem that are active areas of current research.  The talk will involve a variety of interesting continuum-mechanical models and approximations that have analogues in other areas of applied mathematics.


You can join the meeting by clicking on the link below.
Join Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/91733296449?pwd=c29vMDluR0RCRHJia2JEcW1LUVZjUT09
Meeting ID: 917 3329 6449
Password: 329856

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
28 May 2020
16:00
Professor Renaud Lambiotte

Further Information: 

A new bi-weekly seminar series, 'OCIAM learns...."

Internal speakers give a general introduction to a topic on which they are experts.

Abstract

The many facets of community detection on networks 

Community detection, the decomposition of a graph into essential building blocks, has been a core research topic in network science over the past years. Since a precise notion of what consti- tutes a community has remained evasive, community detection algorithms have often been com- pared on benchmark graphs with a particular form of assortative community structure and classified based on the mathematical techniques they employ. However, this comparison can be misleading because apparent similarities in their mathematical machinery can disguise different goals and rea- sons for why we want to employ community detection in the first place. Here we provide a focused review of these different motivations that underpin community detection. This problem-driven classification is useful in applied network science, where it is important to select an appropriate algorithm for the given purpose. Moreover, highlighting the different facets of community detection also delineates the many lines of research and points out open directions and avenues for future research.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
12 March 2020
16:00
to
17:30
Professor Alain Goriely
Abstract

Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s are devastating conditions with poorly understood mechanisms and no known cure. Yet a striking feature of these conditions is the characteristic pattern of invasion throughout the brain, leading to well-codified disease stages visible to neuropathology and associated with various cognitive deficits and pathologies. In this talk, I will show that by linking new mathematical theories to recent progress in imaging, we can unravel some of the universal features associated with dementia and, more generally, brain functions. In particular, I will outline interesting mathematical problems and ideas that naturally appear in the process.

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
5 March 2020
16:00
to
17:30
Jessica Williams and Andrew Krause
Abstract


Heterogeneity in Space and Time: Novel Dispersion Relations in Morphogenesis

Dr. Andrew Krause

Motivated by recent work with biologists, I will showcase some results on Turing instabilities in complex domains. This is scientifically related to understanding developmental tuning in the whiskers of mice, and in synthetic quorum-sensing patterning of bacteria. Such phenomena are typically modelled using reaction-diffusion systems of morphogens, and one is often interested in emergent spatial and spatiotemporal patterns resulting from instabilities of a homogeneous equilibrium. In comparison to the well-known effects of how advection or manifold structure impacts the modes which may become unstable in such systems, I will present results on instabilities in heterogeneous systems, reaction-diffusion systems on evolving manifolds, as well as layered reaction-diffusion systems. These contexts require novel formulations of classical dispersion relations, and may have applications beyond developmental biology, such as in understanding niche formation for populations of animals in heterogeneous environments. These approaches also help close the vast gap between the simplistic theory of instability-driven pattern formation, and the messy reality of biological development, though there is still much work to be done in concretely demonstrating such a theory's applicability in real biological systems.
 

Cavity flow characteristics and applications to kidney stone removal

Dr. Jessica Williams


Ureteroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure for the removal of kidney stones. A ureteroscope, containing a hollow, cylindrical working channel, is inserted into the patient's kidney. The renal space proximal to the scope tip is irrigated, to clear stone particles and debris, with a saline solution that flows in through the working channel. We consider the fluid dynamics of irrigation fluid within the renal pelvis, resulting from the emerging jet through the working channel and return flow through an access sheath . Representing the renal pelvis as a two-dimensional rectangular cavity, we investigate the effects of flow rate and cavity size on flow structure and subsequent clearance time of debris. Fluid flow is modelled with the steady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, with an imposed Poiseuille profile at the inlet boundary to model the jet of saline, and zero-stress conditions on the outlets. The resulting flow patterns in the cavity contain multiple vortical structures. We demonstrate the existence of multiple solutions dependent on the Reynolds number of the flow and the aspect ratio of the cavity using complementary numerical simulations and PIV experiments. The clearance of an initial debris cloud is simulated via solutions to an advection-diffusion equation and we characterise the effects of the initial position of the debris cloud within the vortical flow and the Péclet number on clearance time. With only weak diffusion, debris that initiates within closed streamlines can become trapped. We discuss a flow manipulation strategy to extract debris from vortices and decrease washout time.

 

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
20 February 2020
16:00
to
17:30
Marie Elisabeth Rognes

Further Information: 

Short bio:

Marie E. Rognes is Chief Research Scientist and Research Professor in Scientific Computing and Numerical Analysis at Simula Research Laboratory, Oslo, Norway. She received her Ph.D from the University of Oslo in 2009 with an extended stay at the University of Minneapolis, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, US. She has been at Simula Research Laboratory since 2009, led its Department for Biomedical Computing from 2012-2016 and currently leads a number of research projects focusing on mathematical modelling and numerical methods for brain mechanics including an ERC Starting Grant in Mathematics. She won the 2015 Wilkinson Prize for Numerical Software, the 2018 Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters Prize for Young Researchers within the Natural Sciences, and was a Founding Member of the Young Academy of Norway.

Abstract

Your brain has its own waterscape: whether you are reading or sleeping, fluid flows around or through the brain tissue and clears waste in the process. These physiological processes are crucial for the well-being of the brain. In spite of their importance we understand them but little. Mathematics and numerics could play a crucial role in gaining new insight. Indeed, medical doctors express an urgent need for modeling of water transport through the brain, to overcome limitations in traditional techniques. Surprisingly little attention has been paid to the numerics of the brain’s waterscape however, and fundamental knowledge is missing. In this talk, I will discuss mathematical models and numerical methods for the brain's waterscape across scales - from viewing the brain as a poroelastic medium at the macroscale and zooming in to studying electrical, chemical and mechanical interactions between brain cells at the microscale.
 

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
13 February 2020
16:00
to
17:30
Professor Panos Kevrekidis
Abstract

Nonlinear generalizations of the Schrödinger equation are of wide applicability to a range of areas including atomic and optical systems, 
plasma physics and water waves.  In this  talk we revisit some principal excitations in atomic and optical systems (such as Bose-Einstein condensates and photo-refractive crystals), namely dark solitonic fronts in single-component systems, and dark-bright waves in multi-component systems. Upon introducing them and explaining their existence and stability properties in one spatial dimension, we will extend them both in the form of stripes and in that rings in two-dimensions, presenting an alternative (adiabatic-invariant based) formulation of their stability and excitations. We will explore their filamentary dynamics, as well as the states that emerge from their transverse (snaking) instability. Then, we will consider these structures even in three dimensions, in the form of planar, as well as spherical shell wave patterns and generalize our adiabatic invariant formulation there. Finally, time permitting, we will give some glimpses of how some of these dynamical features in 1d and 2d generalize in a multi-orbital, time-dependent quantum setting.

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
30 January 2020
16:00
to
17:30
Susana Gomes
Abstract

The flow of a thin film down an inclined plane is an important physical phenomenon appearing in many industrial applications, such as coating (where it is desirable to maintain the fluid interface flat) or heat transfer (where a larger interfacial area is beneficial). These applications lead to the need of reliably manipulating the flow in order to obtain a desired interfacial shape. The interface of such thin films can be described by a number of models, each of them exhibiting instabilities for certain parameter regimes. In this talk, I will propose a feedback control methodology based on same-fluid blowing and suction. I use the Kuramoto–Sivashinsky (KS) equation to model interface perturbations and to derive the controls. I will show that one can use a finite number of point-actuated controls based on observations of the interface to stabilise both the flat solution and any chosen nontrivial solution of the KS equation. Furthermore, I will investigate the robustness of the designed controls to uncertain observations and parameter values, and study the effect of the controls across a hierarchy of models for the interface, which include the KS equation, (nonlinear) long-wave models and the full Navier–Stokes equations.

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar

Pages