Mathematical Geoscience Seminar

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
26 January 2018
14:15
Abstract

In contemporary ecology and mathematical biology undergraduate courses, textbooks focus on competition and predation models despite it being accepted that most species on Earth are involved in mutualist relationships. Mutualism is usually discussed more briefly in texts, often from an observational perspective, and obligate mutualism mostly not at all. Part of the reason for this is the lack of a simple math model to successfully explain the observations. Traditionally, particular nonlinearities  are used, which produce a variety of apparently disparate models.

The failure of the traditional linear model to describe coexisting mutualists has been documented from May (1973) through Murray (2001) to Bronstein (2015). Here we argue that this could be because of the use of carrying capacity, and propose the use of a nutrient pool instead, which implies the need for an autotroph (e.g. a plant) that converts nutrients into living resources for higher trophic levels. We show that such a linear model can successfully explain the major features of obligate mutualism when simple expressions for obligated growth are included.

  • Mathematical Geoscience Seminar
9 February 2018
14:15
Jonathan Holmes
Abstract

Numerical simulation provides an important contribution to the management of oil reservoirs, and the ‘reservoir simulator’ has been an essential tool for reservoir engineers since the 1970’s. I will describe the role of the ‘well model’ in reservoir simulation. Its main purpose is to determine the production and injection flows of the reservoir fluids at the surface under a variety of operating constraints, and to supply source and sink terms to the grid cells of the reservoir model.

 

Advances in well technology (horizontal, multilateral, and smart wells containing flow control devices) have imposed additional demands on the well model. It must allow the fluid mixture properties to vary with position in the well, and enable different fluid streams to comingle. Friction may make an important contribution to the local pressure gradient. To provide an improved representation of the physics of fluid flow, the well is discretised into a network of segments, where each segment has its own set of variables describing the multiphase flow conditions. Individual segments can be configured to represent flow control devices, accessing lookup tables or built-in correlations to determine the pressure drop across the device as a function of the flow conditions.

 

The ability to couple the wells to a production facility model such as a pipeline network is a crucial advantage for field development and optimization studies, particularly for offshore fields. I will conclude by comparing two techniques for combining a network model with the reservoir simulation. One method is to extend the simulator’s well model to include the network, providing a fully integrated reservoir/well/network simulation. The other method is to run the reservoir and facility models as separate simulations coupled by a ‘controller’, which periodically balances them by exchanging boundary conditions. The latter approach allows the engineer to use a choice of specialist facility simulators.

  • Mathematical Geoscience Seminar
Add to My Calendar