Past Algebraic Geometry Seminar

3 December 2019
15:45
Karim Adiprasito
Abstract

The hard Lefschetz theorem is a fundamental statement about the symmetry of the cohomology of algebraic varieties. In nearly all cases that we systematically understand it, it comes with a geometric meaning, often in form of Hodge structures and signature data for the Hodge-Riemann bilinear form.

Nevertheless, similar to the role the standard conjectures play in number theory, several intriguing combinatorial problems can be reduced to hard Lefschetz properties, though in extreme cases without much geometric meaning, lacking any existence of, for instance,  an ample cone to do Hodge theory with.

I will present a way to prove the hard Lefschetz theorem in such a situation, by introducing biased pairing and perturbation theory for intersection rings. The price we pay is that the underlying variety, in a precise sense, has itself to be sufficiently generic. For instance, we shall see that any quasismooth, but perhaps nonprojective toric variety can be "perturbed" to a toric variety with the same equivariant cohomology, and that has the hard Lefschetz property.

Finally, I will discuss how this applies to prove some interesting theorems in geometry, topology and combinatorics. In particular, we shall see a generalization of a classical result due to Descartes and Euler: We prove that if a simplicial complex embeds into euclidean 2d-space, the number of d-simplices in it can exceed the number of (d-1)-simplices by a factor of at most d+2.

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
26 November 2019
15:30
Frances Kirwan
Abstract


This talk is an update on joint work with Geoff Penington on extending Morse theory to smooth functions on compact manifolds with very mild nondegeneracy assumptions. The only requirement is that the critical locus should have just finitely many connected components. To such a function we associate a quiver with vertices labelled by the connected components of the critical locus. The analogue of the Morse–Witten complex in this situation is a spectral sequence of multicomplexes supported on this quiver which abuts to the homology of the manifold.

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
19 November 2019
15:30
Bernd Sturmfels
Abstract

Enumerative algebraic geometry counts the solutions to certain geometric constraints. Numerical algebraic geometry determines these solutions for any given 
instance. This lecture illustrates how these two fields complement each other, especially in the light of emerging new applications. We start with a gem from
the 19th century, namely the 3264 conics that are tangent to five given conics in the plane. Thereafter we turn to current problems in statistics, with focus on 
maximum likelihood estimation for linear Gaussian covariance models.
 

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
12 November 2019
15:30
Andrea T. Ricolfi
Abstract

Donaldson-Thomas invariants of a Calabi-Yau 3-fold Y are related to Pandharipande-Thomas invariants via a wall-crossing formula known as the DT/PT correspondence, proved by Bridgeland and Toda. The same relation holds for the “local invariants”, those encoding the contribution of a fixed smooth curve in Y. We show how to lift the local DT/PT correspondence to the motivic level and provide an explicit formula for the local motivic invariants, exploiting the critical structure on certain Quot schemes acting as our local models. Our strategy is parallel to the one used by Behrend, Bryan and Szendroi in their definition and computation of degree zero motivic DT invariants. If time permits, we discuss a further (conjectural) cohomological upgrade of the local DT/PT correspondence.
Joint work with Ben Davison.
 

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
5 November 2019
15:30
Balazs Szendroi
Abstract

I will discuss some recent results around Hilbert schemes of points on singular surfaces, obtained in joint work with Craw, Gammelgaard and Gyenge, and their connection to combinatorics (of coloured partitions) and representation theory (of affine Lie algebras and related algebras such as their W-algebra). 

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
31 October 2019
16:30
Evangelos Routis
Abstract

The space of complete collineations is an important and beautiful chapter of algebraic geometry, which has its origins in the classical works of Chasles, Schubert and many others, dating back to the 19th century. It provides a 'wonderful compactification' (i.e. smooth with normal crossings boundary) of the space of full-rank maps between two (fixed) vector spaces. More recently, the space of complete collineations has been studied intensively and has been used to derive groundbreaking results in diverse areas of mathematics. One such striking example is L. Lafforgue's compactification of the stack of Drinfeld's shtukas, which he subsequently used to prove the Langlands correspondence for the general linear group. 

In joint work with M. Kapranov, we look at these classical spaces from a modern perspective: a complete collineation is simply a spectral sequence of two-term complexes of vector spaces. We develop a theory involving more full-fledged (simply graded) spectral sequences with arbitrarily many terms. We prove that the set of such spectral sequences has the structure of a smooth projective variety, the 'variety of complete complexes', which provides a desingularization, with normal crossings boundary, of the 'Buchsbaum-Eisenbud variety of complexes', i.e. a 'wonderful compactification' of the union of its maximal strata.
 

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
31 October 2019
14:45
Nicola Pagani
Abstract

A fine compactified Jacobian is a proper open substack of the moduli space of simple sheaves. We will see that fine compactified Jacobians correspond to a certain combinatorial datum, essentially obtained by taking multidegrees of all elements of the compactified Jacobian. This picture generalizes to flat families of curves. We will discuss a classification result in the case when the family is the universal family over the moduli space of curves. This is a joint work with Jesse Kass.

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
31 October 2019
13:30
Martin Gallauer
Abstract

Let A be a Tannakian category. Any exact tensor functor defined on A is either zero, or faithful. In this talk, I want to draw attention to a derived analogue of this statement (in characteristic zero) due to Jack Hall and David Rydh, and discuss some remarkable consequences for certain classification problems in algebraic geometry.

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
29 October 2019
15:30
Alexander Vishik
Abstract

The idea of isotropic localization is to substitute an algebro-geometric object (motive)
by its “local” versions, parametrized by finitely generated extensions of the ground field k. In the case of the so-called “flexible” ground field, the complexity of the respective “isotropic motivic categories” is similar to that of their topological counterpart. At the same time, new features appear: the isotropic motivic cohomology of a point encode Milnor’s cohomological operations, while isotropic Chow motives (hypothetically) coincide with Chow motives modulo numerical equivalence (with finite coefficients). Extended versions of the isotropic category permit to access numerical Chow motives with rational coefficients providing a new approach to the old questions related to them. The same localization can be applied to the stable homotopic category of Morel- Voevodsky producing “isotropic” versions of the topological world. The respective isotropic stable homotopy groups of spheres exhibit interesting features.

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
22 October 2019
15:30
Fabian Haiden
Abstract

Stability conditions on triangulated categories were introduced by Bridgeland, based on ideas from string theory. Conjecturally, they control existence of solutions to the deformed Hermitian Yang-Mills equation and the special Lagrangian equation (on the A-side and B-side of mirror symmetry, respectively). I will focus on the symplectic side and sketch a program which replaces special Lagrangians by "spectral networks", certain graphs enhanced with algebraic data. Based on joint work in progress with Katzarkov, Konstevich, Pandit, and Simpson.

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar

Pages