Past Junior Number Theory Seminar

2 March 2020
16:00
Federico Amadio
Abstract

We will discuss some problems around independence of l in compatible systems of Galois representations, mostly focusing on the independence of l of algebraic monodromy groups. We will explain how these problems fit into the context of the Langlands program, and present results both in characteristic zero and in positive characteristic settings.

  • Junior Number Theory Seminar
24 February 2020
16:00
Netan Dogra
Abstract

Understanding the size of the rational points on a curve of higher genus is one of the major open problems in the theory of Diophantine equations. In this talk I will discuss the related problem of understanding how close together rational points can get. I will also discuss the relation to the subject of (generalised) Wieferich primes.

  • Junior Number Theory Seminar
3 February 2020
16:00
Jay Swar
Abstract

Gauss noted quadratic reciprocity to be among his favourite results, and any undergrad will quickly pick up on just how strange it is despite a plethora of elementary proofs. By 1930, E. Artin had finalized Artin reciprocity which wondrously subsumed all previous generalizations, but was still confined to abelian contexts. An amicable non-abelian reciprocity remains a driving force in number-theoretic research.

In this talk, I'll recount Artin reciprocity and show it implies quadratic and cubic reciprocity. I'll then talk about some candidate non-abelian reciprocities, and in particular, which morals of Artin reciprocity they preserve.

  • Junior Number Theory Seminar
27 January 2020
16:00
Wojtek Wawrów
Abstract

Given a number field K, it is natural to ask whether it has a finite extension with ideal class number one. This question can be translated into a fundamental question in class field theory, namely the class field tower problem. In this talk, we are going to discuss this problem as well as its solution due to Golod and Shafarevich using methods of group cohomology.
 

  • Junior Number Theory Seminar
2 December 2019
16:00
George Robinson
Abstract

L-functions have become a vital part of modern number theory over the past century, allowing comparisons between arithmetic objects with seemingly very different properties. In the first part of this talk, I will give an overview of where they arise, their properties, and the mathematics that has developed in order to understand them. In the second part, I will give a sketch of the beautiful result of Herbrand-Ribet concerning the arithmetic interpretations of certain special values of the Riemann zeta function, the prototypical example of an L-function.

  • Junior Number Theory Seminar

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