Fri, 13 May 2022

14:00 - 15:00
N3.12

Representations of Galois groups

Håvard Damm-Johnsen
(University of Oxford)
Abstract

We can learn a lot about an integral domain by studying the Galois group of its fraction field. These groups are generally quite complicated and hard to understand, but their representations, so-called Galois representations, contain more easily accessible information. These also play the lead in many important theorems and conjectures of modern maths, such as the Modularity theorem and the Langlands programme. In this talk we give a quick introduction to Galois representations, motivated by lots of examples aimed at a general algebraist audience, and talk about some open problems.

Fri, 27 May 2022

14:00 - 15:00
N3.12

Branching of representations of symmetric groups and Hecke algebras

Arun Soor
(University of Oxford)
Abstract

We will look at the branching of irreducible representations of symmetric groups from the perspective of Okounkov-Vershik, and then look at Hecke algebras, affine Hecke algebras and cyclotomic Hecke algebras, in particular how the graded Grothendieck groups of their module categories “are” irreducible highest weight modules for affine $sl_l$, where $l$ is the “quantum characteristic”, and the branching graph is a highest weight crystal (for affine $sl_l$). The Fock space realisation of the highest weight crystal will get us back to  the Young graph for in the case of the symmetric group that we considered at the beginning.

Tue, 07 Jun 2022

14:00 - 16:00
N3.12

Shock Reflection and free boundary problems

Professor Mikhail Feldman
(University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Further Information

Sessions will be as follows:

Tuesday 7th, 2:00pm-4:00pm

Wednesday 8th, 2:00pm-3:30pm

Abstract

We will discuss shock reflection phenomena, mathematical formulation of shock reflection problem, structures of  shock reflection configurations, and von Neumann conjectures on transition between regular and Mach reflections. Then we will describe the results on existence and properties of regular reflection solutions for potential flow equation. The approach is to reduce the shock reflection problem to a free boundary problem for a nonlinear  elliptic equation in self-similar coordinates, where the reflected shock is the free boundary, and ellipticity degenerates near a part of a fixed boundary. We will discuss the techniques and methods used in the study of such free boundary problems.

 

Fri, 06 May 2022

14:00 - 15:00
N3.12

Once and Twice Categorified Algebra

Thibault Décoppet
(University of Oxford)
Abstract

I will explain in what sense the theory of finite tensor categories is a categorification of the theory of finite dimensional algebras. In particular, I will introduce finite module categories, review a key result of Ostrik, and present Morita theory for finite categories. I will give many examples to illustrate these ideas. Then, I will explain the elementary properties of finite braided tensor categories. If time permits, I will also mention my own work, which consists in categorifying these ideas once more!

Wed, 02 Feb 2022

16:00 - 17:00
N3.12

Higher Teichmüller spaces

Nathaniel Sagman
(Caltech)
Abstract

The Teichmüller space for a closed surface of genus g is the space of marked complex/hyperbolic structures on the surface. Teichmüller space also identifies with the space of Fuchsian representations of the fundamental group into PSL(2,R) (mod conjugation). Higher Teichmüller theory concerns special representations of surface (or hyperbolic) groups into higher rank Lie groups of non-compact type.

Fri, 19 Nov 2021

15:00 - 16:00
N3.12

Towards a Riemann-Hilbert correspondence for D-cap-modules

Finn Wiersig
(University of Oxford)
Abstract

Locally analytic representations of $p$-adic Lie groups are of interest in several branches of number theory, for example in the theory of automorphic forms and in the $p$-adic local Langlands program. To better understand these representations, Ardakov-Wadsley introduced a sheaf of infinite order differential operators $\overparen{\mathcal{D}}$ on smooth rigid analytic spaces, which resulted in several Beilinson-Bernstein style localisation theorems. In this talk, we discuss the current research on analogues of a Riemann-Hilbert correspondence for $\overparen{\mathcal{D}}$-modules, and what this has to do with complete convex bornological vector spaces.

Fri, 05 Nov 2021
16:00
N3.12

Holographic Duals of Argyres-Douglas Theories

Federico Bonetti
(Oxford University)
Further Information

This seminar will only be in person.

Abstract

Superconformal field theories (SCFTs) of Argyres-Dougles type are inherently strongly coupled and provide a window onto remarkable non-perturbative phenomena (such as mutually non-local massless dyons and relevant Coulomb branch operators of fractional dimension). I am going to discuss the first explicit proposal for the holographic duals of a class of SCFTs of Argyres-Douglas type. The theories under examination are realised by a stack of M5-branes wrapped on a sphere with one irregular puncture and one regular puncture. In the dual 11d supergravity solutions, the irregular puncture is realised as an internal M5-brane source.

Fri, 26 Nov 2021

14:00 - 15:00
N3.12

Extensions of Specht modules and p-ary designs

Liam Jolliffe
(University of Cambridge)
Abstract

The Specht modules are of fundamental importance to the representation theory of the symmetric group, and their 0th cohomology is understood through entirely combinatorial methods due to Gordon James. Over fields of odd characteristic, Hemmer proposed a similar combinatorial approach to calculating their 1st degree cohomology, or extensions by the trivial module. This combinatorial approach motivates the definition of universal $p$-ary designs, which we shall classify. We then explore the consequences of this classification to problem of determining extensions of Specht modules. In particular, we classify all extensions of Specht modules indexed by two-part partitions by the trivial module and shall see some far-reaching conditions on when the first cohomology of a Specht module is trivial.

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