Past Fridays@2

15 October 2021
14:00
Dr Vicky Neale
Abstract

We'll discuss what mathematicians are looking for in written solutions.  How can you set out your ideas clearly, and what are the standard mathematical conventions?

This session is likely to be most relevant for first-year undergraduates, but all are welcome.

19 February 2021
14:00
Dr Vicky Neale
Abstract

Mathematicians need to talk and write about their mathematics.  This includes undergraduates and MSc students, who might be writing a dissertation or project report, preparing a presentation on a summer research project, or preparing for a job interview.  It can be helpful to think of this as a form of storytelling, as this can lead to more effective communication.  For a story to be engaging you also need to know your audience.  In this interactive session, we'll discuss what we mean by telling a mathematical story, give you some top tips from our experience, and give you a chance to think about how you might put this into practice.

27 November 2020
14:00
Dr Richard Earl and Dr Neil Laws
Abstract

This session is particularly aimed at fourth-year and OMMS students who are completing a dissertation this year. The talk will be given by Dr Richard Earl who chairs Projects Committee. For many of you this will be the first time you have written such an extended piece on mathematics. The talk will include advice on planning a timetable, managing the workload, presenting mathematics, structuring the dissertation and creating a narrative, providing references and avoiding plagiarism.

13 November 2020
14:00
Various
Abstract

The session will be a panel discussion addressing practical aspects of doing a research degree. We will take questions from the audience so will discuss whatever people wish to ask us, but we expect to talk about the process of applying, why you might want to consider doing a research degree, the experience of doing research, and what people do after they have completed their degree.

23 October 2020
14:00
Dr Richard Earl, Dr Neil Laws and Dr Vicky Neale
Abstract

What should you expect in intercollegiate classes?  What can you do to get the most out of them?  In this session, experienced class tutors will share their thoughts, including advice about hybrid and online classes. 

All undergraduate and masters students welcome, especially Part B and MSc students attending intercollegiate classes. (Students who attended the Part C/OMMS induction event will find significant overlap between the advice offered there and this session!)

16 October 2020
14:00
Dr Vicky Neale
Abstract

In this interactive workshop, we'll discuss what mathematicians are looking for in written solutions.  How can you set out your ideas clearly, and what are the standard mathematical conventions?

This session is likely to be most relevant for first-year undergraduates, but all are welcome.

6 March 2020
14:00
James Munro and Mareli Grady
Abstract

Have you ever had to explain mathematics to someone who isn’t a mathematician? Maybe you’ve been cornered at a family gathering by an interested relative. Maybe you’d like to explain to a potential employer what you’ve been doing for the last three years. Maybe you’ve agreed to explain vector calculus to a room of 13-year-olds. We’ve all been there. This session will cover some top tips for talking about maths in a way that makes sense to non-mathematicians, with specific examples from the outreach team.

21 February 2020
14:00
Dr Vicky Neale and Dr Richard Earl
Abstract

Mathematicians need to talk and write about their mathematics.  This includes undergraduates and MSc students, who may be writing a dissertation or project report, preparing a presentation on a summer research project, or preparing for a job interview.  We think that it can be helpful to think of this as a form of storytelling, as this can lead to more effective communication.  For a story to be engaging you also need to know your audience.  In this session, we'll discuss what we mean by telling a mathematical story, give you some top tips from our experience, and give you a chance to think about how you might put this into practice.

14 February 2020
14:00
Dr Vicky Neale
Abstract

When your lecturers say that they expect you to study your notes between lectures, what do they really mean?  There is research on how mathematicians go about reading maths effectively.  We'll look at a technique (self-explanation training) that has been shown to improve students' comprehension of proofs, and in this interactive workshop we'll practise together on some examples.  Please bring a pen/pencil and paper!

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