Tue, 26 Jan 2010

15:45 - 16:45
L3

(HoRSe seminar) Symmetric and reduced obstruction theories

Richard Thomas
(Imperial College London)
Abstract
I will describe some more of the deformation theory necessary for the first talk. This leads to a number of natural questions and counterexamples. This talk requires a strong stomach, or a fanatical devotion to symmetric obstruction theories.
Tue, 26 Jan 2010

14:00 - 15:00
SR1

(HoRSe seminar) GW/stable pairs on K3 surfaces

Richard Thomas
(Imperial College London)
Abstract
The Katz-Klemm-Vafa formula is a conjecture expressing Gromov-Witten invariants of K3 surfaces in terms of modular forms. In genus 0 it reduces to the (proved) Yau-Zaslow formula. I will explain how the correspondence between stable pairs and Gromov-Witten theory for toric 3-folds (proved by Maulik-Oblomkov-Okounkov-Pandharipande), some calculations with stable pairs (due to Kawai-Yoshioka) and some deformation theory lead to a proof of the KKV formula.
(This is joint work with Davesh Maulik and Rahul Pandharipande. Only they understand the actual formulae. People who like modular forms are not encouraged to come to this talk.)
Tue, 01 Dec 2009

15:00 - 16:00
Imperial College

(HoRSe seminar at Imperial College) Moduli of Calabi-Yau 3-folds and instantons on $G_2$ manifolds

Simon Donaldson
(Imperial College London)
Abstract
This talk will be largely speculative. First we consider the formal properties that could be expected of a "topological field theory" in 6+1 dimensions defined by $G_2$ instantons. We explain that this could lead to holomorphic bundles over moduli spaces of Calabi-Yau 3-folds whose ranks are the DT-invariants. We also discuss in more detail the compactness problem for $G_2$ instantons and associative submanifolds.

The talk will be held in Room 408, Imperial College Maths Department, Huxley Building, 180 Queen’s Gate, London.

Tue, 01 Dec 2009

13:30 - 14:30
Imperial College

(HoRSe seminar at Imperial college) Gauge theory and exceptional holonomy

Simon Donaldson
(Imperial College London)
Abstract
This talk will review material, well-known to specialists, on calibrated geometry and Yang-Mills theory over manifolds with holonomy $SU(3)$, $G_2$ or $Spin(7)$. We will also describe extensions of the standard set-up, modelled on Gromov's "taming forms" for almost-complex structures.

The talk will be held in Room 408, Imperial College Maths Department, Huxley Building, 180 Queen’s Gate, London.

Thu, 28 Jan 2010

16:30 - 17:30
DH 1st floor SR

STEADY STREAMING, VORTEX WAVE INTERACTION THEORY, SELF SUSTAINED PROCESSES AND COHERENT STRUCTURES IN TURBULENT SHEAR FLOWS

Phil Hall
(Imperial College London)
Abstract
Some years ago Hall and Smith in a number of papers developed a theory governing the interaction of vortices and waves in shear flows. In recent years immense interest has been focused on so-called self-sustained processes in turbulent shear flows where the importance of waves interacting with streamwise vortex flows has been elucidated in a number of; see for example the work of Waleffe and colleagues, Kerswell, Gibson, etc. These processes have a striking resemblance to coherent structures observed in turbulent shear flow and for that reason they are often referred to as exact coherent structures. It is shown that the structures associated with the so-called 'lower branch' state, which has been shown to play a crucial role in these self-sustained process, is nothing but a Rayleigh wave vortex interaction with a wave system generating streamwise vortices inside a critical layer. The theory enables the reduction of the 3D Navier Stokes equations to a coupled system for a steady streamwise vortex and an inviscid wave system. The reduced system for the streamwise vortices must be solved with jump conditions in the shear across the critical layer and the position of that layer constitutes a nonlinear pde eigenvalue problem. Remarkable agreement between the asymptotic theory and numerical simulations is found thereby demonstrating the importance of vortex-wave interaction theory in the mathematical description of coherent structures in turbulent shear flows. The theory offers the possibility of drag reduction in turbulent shear flows by controlling the flow to the neighborhood of the lower branch state. The relevance of the work to more general shear flows is also discussed.
Mon, 13 Jul 2009
18:00

Public Lecture in PDE - Analysis, models and simulations

Professor Pierre-Louis Lions
(Imperial College London)
Abstract

In this talk, Professor Lions will first present several examples of numerical simulations of complex industrial systems. All these simulations rely upon some mathematical models involving partial differential equations and he will briefly explain the nature, history and role of such equations. Examples showing the importance of the mathematical analysis (i.e. ‘understanding’) of those models will be presented, concluding with a few trends and perspectives.


Pierre-Louis Lions is the son of the famous mathematician Jacques-Louis Lions and has himself become a renowned mathematician, making numerous important contributions to the theory of non-linear partial differential equations. He was awarded a Fields Medal in 1994, in particular for his work with Ron DiPerna giving the first general proof that the Boltzmann equation of the kinetic theory of gases has solutions. Other awards Lions has received include the IBM Prize in 1987 and the Philip Morris Prize in 1991. Currently he holds the position of Chair of Partial Differential Equations and their Applications at the prestigious Collège de France in Paris.


This lecture is given as part of the 7th ISAAC Congress • www.isaac2009.org

Clore Lecture Theatre, Huxley Building, Imperial College London,
South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ

RSVP: Attendance is free, but with registration in advance
Michael Ruzhansky • @email

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