Tue, 28 May 2019

12:00 - 13:15
L4

The Swampland, Holography and the Large Volume Scenario

Joseph Conlon
(Oxford)
Abstract

String compactifications are essential for connecting string theory to low energy particle physics and cosmology. Moduli stabilisation gives rise to effective Lagrangians that capture the low-energy degrees of freedom. Much recent interest has been on swampland consistency conditions on such effective
field theories - which low energy Lagrangians can arise from quantum gravity? Furthermore, given that moduli stabilisation scenarios often exist in AdS space, we can also ask: what do swampland conditions mean in the context of AdS/CFT? I describe work on developing a holographic understanding of moduli stabilisation and swampland consistency conditions. I focus in particular on the Large Volume Scenario, which is especially appealing from a holographic perspective as in the large volume limit all its interactions can be expressed solely in terms of the AdS radius, with no free dimensionless parameters.

 

Tue, 30 Apr 2019

14:00 - 15:15
L4

Single electron entanglement and the Aharonov-Bohm Effect

Vlatko Vedral
(Oxford)
Further Information

Please note the change of time (just this week)

Abstract

I will review the idea that entanglement must ultimately be understood in terms of modes, rather than in terms of particles. The most striking instance of mode entanglement is a single particle entangled state, which I will discuss both in the case of bosons as well as in the case of fermions. I then proceed to show that the Aharonov-Bohm effect can be understood by using a single electron entangled state. Finally, I will argue that this demonstrates beyond doubt that the Aharonov-Bohm effect is non non-local, contrary to what is frequently claimed in the literature.

 

Mon, 17 Jun 2019

14:15 - 15:15
L4

Bryant-Salamon metrics and coassociative fibrations

Jason Lotay
(Oxford)
Abstract

The first examples of complete holonomy G2 metrics were constructed by Bryant-Salamon and are thus of central importance in geometry, but also in physics, appearing for example in the work of Atiyah-Witten, Acharya-Witten and Acharya-Gukov.   I will describe joint work in progress with Spiro Karigiannis which realises Bryant-Salamon manifolds in dimension 7 as coassociative fibrations.  In particular, I will discuss the relationship of this study to gravitational instantons, conical singularities, and to recent work of Donaldson and Joyce-Karigiannis.

 

Tue, 05 Mar 2019
12:00
L4

Supersymmetric S-matrices via ambitwistors and the polarized scattering equations

Lionel Mason
(Oxford)
Abstract

Six-dimensional theories provide a unification of four-dimensional theories via dimensional reduction  together with access to some of the novel features arising from M-theory.  Ambitwistor strings directly generate S-matrices for massless theories in terms of formulae that localize on the solutions to the scattering equations; algebraic equations that determine n points on the Riemann sphere from n massless momenta.  These are sufficient to provide compact formulae for tree-level S-matrices for bosonic theories. This talk introduces their extension to the polarized scattering equations which arise from twistorial versions on ambitwistor-strings.  These lead to simple explicit formulae for superamplitudes in 6D for super Yang-Mills, supergravity, D5 and M5 branes and massive superamplitudes in 4D.  The framework extends also to 10 and 11 dimensions.  This is based on joint work with Yvonne Geyer, arxiv:1812.05548 and 1901.00134. 

Mon, 20 May 2019

14:15 - 15:15
L4

Stratifications and coarse moduli spaces for the stack of Higgs bundles

Eloise Hamilton
(Oxford)
Abstract

The stack of Higgs bundles of a given rank and degree over a non-singular projective curve can be stratified in two ways: according to its Higgs Harder-Narasimhan type (its instability type) and according to the Harder-Narasimhan type of the underlying vector bundle (instability type of the underlying bundle). The semistable stratum is an open stratum of the former and admits a coarse moduli space, namely the moduli space of semistable Higgs bundles. It can be constructed using Geometric Invariant Theory (GIT) and is a widely studied moduli space due to its rich geometric structure.

In this talk I will explain how recent advances in Non-Reductive GIT can be used to refine the Higgs Harder-Narasimhan and Harder-Narasimhan stratifications in such a way that each refined stratum admits a coarse moduli space. I will explicitly describe these refined stratifications and their intersection in the case of rank 2 Higgs bundles, and discuss the topology and geometry of the corresponding moduli spaces

Mon, 25 Feb 2019
12:45
L5

The Laplacian flow in G_2 geometry

Jason Lotay
(Oxford)
Abstract

Finding Riemannian metrics with holonomy G_2 is a challenging problem with links in mathematics to Einstein metrics and area-minimizing submanifolds, and to M-theory in theoretical physics.  I will provide a brief survey on recent progress towards studying this problem using a geometric flow approach, including connections to calibrated fibrations.

Tue, 26 Feb 2019

14:30 - 15:00
L3

Multispectral snapshot demosaicing via non-convex matrix completion

Simon Vary
(Oxford)
Abstract

Snapshot mosaic multispectral imagery acquires an undersampled data cube by acquiring a single spectral measurement per spatial pixel. Sensors which acquire p frequencies, therefore, suffer from severe 1/p undersampling of the full data cube.  We show that the missing entries can be accurately imputed using non-convex techniques from sparse approximation and matrix completion initialised with traditional demosaicing algorithms.

Tue, 05 Mar 2019

14:30 - 15:00
L5

MLQMC Methods for Elliptic PDEs Driven by White Noise

Matteo Croci
(Oxford)
Abstract

When solving partial differential equations driven by additive spatial white noise, the efficient sampling of white noise realizations can be challenging. In this talk we focus on the efficient sampling of white noise using quasi-random points in a finite element method and multilevel Quasi Monte Carlo (MLQMC) setting. This work is an extension of previous research on white noise sampling for MLMC.

We express white noise as a wavelet series expansion that we divide in two parts. The first part is sampled using quasi-random points and contains a finite number of terms in order of decaying importance to ensure good QMC convergence. The second part is a correction term which is sampled using standard pseudo-random numbers.

We show how the sampling of both terms can be performed in linear time and memory complexity in the number of mesh cells via a supermesh construction. Furthermore, our technique can be used to enforce the MLQMC coupling even in the case of non-nested mesh hierarchies. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method with numerical experiments.

Tue, 19 Feb 2019

14:00 - 14:30
L3

Stochastic Analysis and Correction of Floating Point Errors in Monte Carlo Simulations

Oliver Sheridan-Methven
(Oxford)
Abstract

In this talk we will show how the floating point errors in the simulation of SDEs (stochastic differential equations) can be modelled as stochastic. Furthermore, we will show how these errors can be corrected within a multilevel Monte Carlo approach which performs most calculations with low precision, but a few calculations with higher precision. The same procedure can also be used to correct for errors in converting from uniform random numbers to approximate Normal random numbers. Numerical results will be generated on both CPUs (using single/double precision) and GPUs (using half/single precision).

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