Thu, 04 Feb 2021

12:00 - 13:00
Virtual

From Fast Cars to Breathing Aids: the UCL Ventura Non-Invasive Ventilator for COVID-19

Rebecca Shipley
(UCL)
Further Information

We continue this term with our flagship seminars given by notable scientists on topics that are relevant to Industrial and Applied Mathematics. 

Note the new time of 12:00-13:00 on Thursdays.

This will give an opportunity for the entire community to attend and for speakers with childcare responsibilities to present.

Abstract

In March 2020, as COVID-19 cases started to surge for the first time in the UK, a team spanning UCL engineers, University College London Hospital (UCLH) intensivists and Mercedes Formula 1 came together to design, manufacture and deploy non-invasive breathing aids for COVID-19 patients. We reverse engineered and an off-patent CPAP (continuous positive airways pressure) device, the Philips WhisperFlow, and changed its design to minimise its oxygen utilisation (given that hospital oxygen supplies are under extreme demand). The UCL-Ventura received regulatory approvals from the MHRA within 10 days, and Mercedes HPP manufactured 10,000 devices by mid-April. UCL-Ventura CPAPs are now in use in over 120 NHS hospitals.


In response to international need, the team released all blueprints open source to enable local manufacture in other countries, alongside a support package spanning technical, manufacturing, clinical and regulatory components. The designs have been downloaded 1900 times across 105 countries, and around 20 teams are now manufacturing at scale and deploying in local hospitals. We have also worked closely with NGOs, on a non-profit basis, to deliver devices directly to countries with urgent need, including Palestine, Uganda and South Africa.

Tue, 03 Nov 2020
15:30
Virtual

An improvement on Łuczak's connected matchings method

Shoham Letzter
(UCL)
Further Information

Part of the Oxford Discrete Maths and Probability Seminar, held via Zoom. Please see the seminar website for details.

Abstract

A connected matching is a matching contained in a connected component. A well-known method due to Łuczak reduces problems about monochromatic paths and cycles in complete graphs to problems about monochromatic matchings in almost complete graphs. We show that these can be further reduced to problems about monochromatic connected matchings in complete graphs.
    
I will describe Łuczak's reduction, introduce the new reduction, and mention potential applications of the improved method.

Mon, 02 Mar 2020

14:15 - 15:15
L4

Cohomogeneity one families in Spin(7)-geometry

Fabian Lehmann
(UCL)
Abstract

An 8-dimensional Riemannian manifold with holonomy group contained in Spin(7) is Ricci-flat, but not Kahler. The condition that the holonomy reduces to Spin(7) is equivalent to a complicated system of non-linear PDEs. In the non-compact setting, symmetries can be used to reduce this complexity. In the case of cohomogeneity one manifolds, i.e. where a generic orbit has codimension one, the non-linear PDE system
reduces to a nonlinear ODE system. I will discuss recent progress in the construction of 1-parameter families of complete cohomogeneity one Spin(7) holonomy metrics. All examples are asymptotically conical (AC) or asymptotically locally conical (ALC).

 

Thu, 30 Jan 2020
16:00
L5

The p-part of BSD for residually reducible elliptic curves of rank one

Giada Grossi
(UCL)
Abstract

Let E be an elliptic curve over the rationals and p a prime such that E admits a rational p-isogeny satisfying some assumptions. In a joint work with J. Lee and C. Skinner, we prove the anticyclotomic Iwasawa main conjecture for E/K for some suitable quadratic imaginary field K. I will explain our strategy and how this, combined with complex and p-adic Gross-Zagier formulae, allows us to prove that if E has rank one, then the p-part of the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer formula for E/Q holds true.
 

Thu, 05 Dec 2019
16:00
L6

On the negative Pell equation

Stephanie Chan
(UCL)
Abstract

Stevenhagen conjectured that the density of d such that the negative Pell equation x^2-dy^2=-1 is solvable over the integers is 58.1% (to the nearest tenth of a percent), in the set of positive squarefree integers having no prime factors congruent to 3 modulo 4. In joint work with Peter Koymans, Djordjo Milovic, and Carlo Pagano, we use a recent breakthrough of Smith to prove that the infimum of this density is at least 53.8%, improving previous results of Fouvry and Klüners, by studying the distribution of the 8-rank of narrow class groups of quadratic number fields.

Thu, 21 Nov 2019
16:00
L6

The Weyl subconvex exponent for Dirichlet L-functions.

Ian Petrow
(UCL)
Abstract

In the 1920s Weyl proved the first non-trivial estimate for the Riemann zeta function on the critical line: \zeta(1/2+it) << (1+|t|)^{1/6+\epsilon}. The analogous bound for a Dirichlet L-function L(1/2,\chi) of conductor q as q tends to infinity is still unknown in full generality. In a breakthrough around 2000, Conrey and Iwaniec proved the analogue of the Weyl bound for L(1/2,\chi) when \chi is assumed to be quadratic of conductor q.  Building on the work of Conrey and Iwaniec, we show (joint work with Matt Young) that the Weyl bound for L(1/2,\chi) holds for all primitive Dirichlet characters \chi. The extension to all moduli q is based on aLindelöf-on-average upper bound for the fourth moment of Dirichlet L-functions of conductor q along a coset of the subgroup of characters modulo d when q^*|d, where q^* is the least positive integer such that q^2|(q^*)^3.

Thu, 23 Jan 2020

14:00 - 15:00
L4

Computational boundary element methods with Bempp

Timo Betcke
(UCL)
Abstract

Boundary integral equations are an elegant tool to model and simulate a range of physical phenomena in bounded and unbounded domains.

While mathematically well understood, the numerical implementation (e.g. via boundary element methods) still poses a number of computational challenges, from the efficient assembly of the underlying linear systems up to the fast preconditioned solution in complex applications. In this talk we provide an overview of some of these challenges and demonstrate the efficient implementation of boundary element methods on modern CPU and GPU architectures. As part of the talk we will present a number of practical examples using the Bempp-cl boundary element software, our next generation boundary element package, that has been developed in Python and supports modern vectorized CPU instruction sets and a number of GPU types.

Thu, 02 May 2019

16:00 - 17:00
L6

Arithmetic quantum chaos and small scale equidistribution

Peter Humphries
(UCL)
Abstract

Berry's random wave conjecture is a heuristic that the eigenfunctions of a classically ergodic system ought to display Gaussian random behaviour, as though they were random waves, in the large eigenvalue limit. We discuss two manifestations of this conjecture for eigenfunctions of the Laplacian on the modular surface: Planck scale mass equidistribution, and an asymptotic for the fourth moment. We will highlight how the resolution of these two problems in this number-theoretic setting involves a delicate understanding of the behaviour of certain families of L-functions.

Wed, 13 Feb 2019
16:00
C1

Applications of stackings of graphs

Joseph MacColl
(UCL)
Abstract

A stacking is a lift of an immersion of graphs $A\to B$ to an embedding of $A$ into the product of $B$ with the real line; their existence relates to orderability properties of groups. I will describe how Louder and Wilton used them to prove Wise's "$w$-cycles" conjecture: given a primitive word $w$ in a free group $F$, and a subgroup $H < F$, the number of conjugates of $H$ which intersect $<w>$ nontrivially is at most rank($H$). I will also discuss applications of the result to questions of coherence, and possible extensions of it.

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