Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
6 June 2019
16:00
to
17:30
Dr. Lorna Ayton
Abstract

Aerodynamic noise is a fundamental concern facing the aviation industry,
whether it's the noise generated by a passenger aeroplane, or by a
delivery drone. The key feature linking all aerodynamic designs is
aerofoils/blades which generate both leading- and trailing-edge noise
through interaction with unsteady fluid flows. This talk will first
discuss the basics of noise generation by aerofoils in unsteady subsonic
flows, followed by discussing new adapted blade designs for
reducing leading-edge noise. In particular this talk will present
mathematical models that are capable of quickly predicting the generated
noise and can be used to aid in designing an acoustcally optimal aerofoil.

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
7 June 2019
14:00
Abstract

Mechanobiology is a field of science that aims to understand how mechanics regulate biology. It focuses on how mechanical forces and alterations in mechanical properties of cell or tissues regulate biological processes in development, physiology and disease. In fact, all these processes occur in our body, which presents a clear structural and hierarchical organization that goes from the organism to the cellular level. To advance in the understanding of all these processes at different scales requires the use of simplified representations of our body, which is normally known as modelling or equivalently the creation of a model. Different types of models can be found in the literature: in-vitro, in-vivo and in-silico models.

Here, I will present our modelling strategy in which we integrate different mathematical models and experiments in order to tackle relevant mechanical-based mechanisms in wound healing and cancer metastasis progression [1,2]. In fact, we have focused our research on individual [3] and collective cell migration [4], because it is a crucial event in all these mechanisms. Therefore, unravelling the intrinsic mechanisms that cells use to define their migration is an essential element for advancing the development of new technologies in regenerative medicine and cancer.

Due to the complexity of all these mechanisms, mathematical modelling is a relevant tool for providing deeper insight and quantitative predictions of the mechanical interplay between cells and extracellular matrix during cell migration. To assess the predictive capacity of these models, we will compare our numerical results with microfluidic-based experiments [2], which provide experimental information to test and refine the main assumptions of our models.

Actually, we design and fabricate multi-channel 3D microfluidics cell culture chips, which allow recreating the physiology and disease of one organ or any biological process with a precise control of the micro environmental factors [5]. Therefore, this kind of organ-on-a-chip experiments constitutes a novel modelling strategy of in vitro multicellular human systems that in combination with mathematical simulations provide a relevant tool for research in mechanobiology.

References

Escribano J, Chen M, Moeendarbary E, Cao X, Shenoy V, Garcia-Aznar JM, Kamm RD, Spill F.  Balance of Mechanical Forces Drives Endothelial Gap Formation and May Facilitate Cancer and Immune-Cell Extravasation. PLOS Computational Biology, in press.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
10 June 2019
14:15
Ruadhai Dervan
Abstract

Moduli spaces of polarised varieties (varieties together with an ample line bundle) are not Hausdorff in general. A basic goal of algebraic geometry is to construct a Hausdorff moduli space of some nice class of polarised varieties. I will discuss how one can achieve this goal using the theory of canonical Kähler metrics. In addition I will discuss some fundamental properties of this moduli space, for example the existence of a Weil-Petersson type Kähler metric. This is joint work with Philipp Naumann.

  • Geometry and Analysis Seminar
10 June 2019
14:15
VEDRAN SOHINGER
Abstract

Gibbs measures of nonlinear Schrödinger equations are a fundamental object used to study low-regularity solutions with random initial data. In the dispersive PDE community, this point of view was pioneered by Bourgain in the 1990s. We study the problem of the derivation of Gibbs measures as high-temperature limits of thermal states in many-body quantum mechanics.

In our work, we apply a perturbative expansion in the interaction. This expansion is then analysed by means of Borel resummation techniques. In two and three dimensions, we need to apply a Wick-ordering renormalisation procedure. Moreover, in one dimension, our methods allow us to obtain a microscopic derivation of the time-dependent correlation functions for the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation. This is based partly on joint work with Jürg Fröhlich, Antti Knowles, and Benjamin Schlein.

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar
10 June 2019
15:45
Michael Magee
Abstract


For any word w in a free group of rank r>0, and any compact group G, w induces a `word map' from G^r to G by substitutions of elements of G for the letters of w. We may also choose the r elements of G independently with respect to Haar measure on G, and then apply the word map. This gives a random element of G whose distribution depends on w. An interesting observation is that this distribution doesn't change if we change w by an automorphism of the free group. It is a wide open question whether the measures induced by w on compact groups determine w up to automorphisms.
My talk will be mostly about the case G = U(n), the n by n complex unitary matrices. The technical tool we use is a precise formula for the moments of the distribution induced by w on U(n). In the formula, there is a surprising appearance of concepts from infinite group theory, more specifically, Euler characteristics of mapping class groups of surfaces. I'll explain how our formula allows us to make progress on the question described above.
This is joint work with Doron Puder (Tel Aviv).
 

10 June 2019
15:45
DARIO TREVISAN
Abstract

We discuss some results on integration of ``rough differential forms'', which are generalizations of classical (smooth) differential forms to similar objects involving Hölder continuous functions that may be nowhere differentiable. Motivations arise mainly from geometric problems related to irregular surfaces, and the techniques are naturally related to those of Rough Paths theory. We show in particular that such a geometric integration can be constructed substituting appropriately differentials with more general asymptotic expansions (of Stratonovich or Ito type) and by summing over a refining sequence of partitions, leading to a two-dimensional extension of the classical Young integral, that coincides with the integral introduced recently by R. Züst. We further show that Stratonovich sums gives an advantage allowing to weaken the requirements on Hölder exponents, and discuss some work in progress in the stochastic case. Based on joint works with E. Stepanov, G. Alberti and I. Ballieul.

 

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar
10 June 2019
16:00
Kumbakonam Rajagopal
Abstract

After discussing the need for implicit constitutive relations to describe the response of both solids and fluids, I will discuss applications wherein such implicit constitutive relations can be gainfully exploited. It will be shown that such implicit relations can explain phenomena that have hitherto defied adequate explanation such as fracture and the movement of cracks in solids, the response of biological matter, and provide a new way to look at numerous non-linear phenomena exhibited by fluids. They provide a totally new and innovative way to look at the problem of Turbulence. It also turns out that classical Cauchy and Green elasticity are a small subset of the more general theory of elastic bodies defined by implicit constitutive equations. 

  • Partial Differential Equations Seminar

Pages

Add to My Calendar