Past Number Theory Seminar

E.g., 2020-04-08
E.g., 2020-04-08
E.g., 2020-04-08
12 March 2020
16:00
Brendan Murphy
Abstract

In joint work with James Wheeler, we show that if a subset $A$ of $GL_n(\mathbb{F}_q)$ is a $K$-approximate group and the group $G$ it generates is soluble, then there are subgroups $U$ and $S$ of $G$ and a constant $k$ depending only on $n$ such that:

$A$ quickly generates $U$: $U\subseteq A^k$,
$S$ contains a large proportion of $A$: $|A^k\cap S| \gg K^{-k}|A|, and
$S/U$ is nilpotent.

Briefly: approximate soluble linear groups over any finite field are (almost) finite by nilpotent.

The proof uses a sum-product theorem and exponential sum estimates, as well as some representation theory, but the presentation will be mostly self-contained.

  • Number Theory Seminar
5 March 2020
16:00
Christopher Deninger
Abstract

We construct a functor from arithmetic schemes (and dominant morphisms) to dynamical systems which allows to recover the Hasse-Weil zeta function of a scheme as a Ruelle type zeta function of the corresponding dynamical system. We state some further properties of this correspondence and explain the relation to the work of Kucharczyk and Scholze who realize the Galois groups of fields containing all roots of unity as (etale) fundamental groups of certain topological spaces. We also explain the main reason why our dynamical systems are not yet the right ones and in what regard they need to be refined.
 

  • Number Theory Seminar
27 February 2020
16:00
Spencer Bloch
Abstract


One can study periods of algebraic varieties by a process of "fibering out" in which the variety is fibred over a punctured curve $f:X->U$. I will explain this process and how it leads to the classical Picard Fuchs (or Gauss-Manin) differential equations. Periods are computed by integrating solutions of Picard Fuchs over suitable closed paths on $U$. One can also couple (i.e.tensor) the Picard Fuchs connection to given connections on $U$. For example, $t^s$ with $t$ a unit on $U$ and $s$ a parameter is a solution of the connection on $\mathscr{O}_U$ given by $\nabla(1) = sdt/t$. Our "periods" become integrals over suitable closed chains on $U$ of $f(t)t^sdt/t$. Golyshev called the resulting functions of $s$ "motivic Gamma functions". 
Golyshev and Zagier studied certain special Picard Fuchs equations for their proof of the Gamma conjecture in mirror symmetry in the case of Picard rank 1. They write down a generating series, the Apéry series, the knowledge of the first few terms of which implied the gamma conjecture. We show their Apéry series is the Taylor series of a product of the motivic Gamma function times an elementary function of $s$. In particular, the coefficients of the Apéry series are periods up to inverting $2\pi i$. We relate these periods to periods of the limiting mixed Hodge structure at a point of maximal unipotent monodromy. This is joint work with M. Vlasenko. 
 

  • Number Theory Seminar
20 February 2020
16:00
Abstract

The famous Birch & Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture predicts that the (algebraic) rank of an elliptic curve is equal to the so-called analytic rank, which is the order of vanishing of the associated L-functions at the central point. In this talk, we shall discuss the analytic rank of automorphic L-functions in an "alternate universe". This is joint work with Kyle Pratt and Alexandru Zaharescu.

  • Number Theory Seminar
13 February 2020
16:00
James Newton
Abstract

Some of the simplest expected cases of Langlands functoriality are the symmetric power liftings Sym^r from automorphic representations of GL(2) to automorphic representations of GL(r+1). I will discuss some joint work with Jack Thorne on the symmetric power lifting for holomorphic modular forms.

  • Number Theory Seminar
6 February 2020
16:00
Adam Harper
Abstract

I will describe some new-ish results on the average and maximum size of the Riemann zeta function in a "typical" interval of length 1 on the critical line. A (hopefully) interesting feature of the proofs is that they reduce the problem for the zeta function to an analogous problem for a random model, which can then be solved using various probabilistic techniques.

  • Number Theory Seminar
30 January 2020
16:00
Giada Grossi
Abstract

Let E be an elliptic curve over the rationals and p a prime such that E admits a rational p-isogeny satisfying some assumptions. In a joint work with J. Lee and C. Skinner, we prove the anticyclotomic Iwasawa main conjecture for E/K for some suitable quadratic imaginary field K. I will explain our strategy and how this, combined with complex and p-adic Gross-Zagier formulae, allows us to prove that if E has rank one, then the p-part of the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer formula for E/Q holds true.
 

  • Number Theory Seminar
5 December 2019
16:00
Stephanie Chan
Abstract

Stevenhagen conjectured that the density of d such that the negative Pell equation x^2-dy^2=-1 is solvable over the integers is 58.1% (to the nearest tenth of a percent), in the set of positive squarefree integers having no prime factors congruent to 3 modulo 4. In joint work with Peter Koymans, Djordjo Milovic, and Carlo Pagano, we use a recent breakthrough of Smith to prove that the infimum of this density is at least 53.8%, improving previous results of Fouvry and Klüners, by studying the distribution of the 8-rank of narrow class groups of quadratic number fields.

  • Number Theory Seminar
28 November 2019
16:00
Wushi Goldring
Abstract

My talk will have two protagonists: (1) Automorphic representations which -- let's be honest -- are very complicated and mysterious, but also (2) Involutions  (=automorphisms of order at most 2) of connected reductive groups -- these are very concrete and can often be represented by diagonal matrices with entries 1,-1 or i, -i. The goal is to explain how difficult questions about (1) can be reduced to relatively easy, concrete questions about (2).
Automorphic representations are representation-theoretic generalizations of modular forms. Like modular forms, automorphic representations are initially defined analytically. But unlike modular forms -- where we have a reinterpretation in terms of algebraic geometry -- for most automorphic representations we currently only have a (real) analytic definition. The Langlands Program predicts that a wide class of automorphic representations admit the same algebraic properties which have been known to hold for modular forms since the 1960's and 70's. In particular, certain complex numbers "Hecke eigenvalues" attached to these automorphic representations are conjectured to be algebraic numbers. This remains open in many cases (especially those cases of interest in number theory and algebraic geometry), in particular for Maass forms -- functions on the upper half-plane which are a non-holomorphic variant of modular forms.
I will explain how elementary structure theory of reductive groups over the complex numbers provides new insight into the above algebraicity conjectures; in particular we deduce that the Hecke eigenvalues are algebraic for an infinite class of examples where this was not previously known. 
After applying a bunch of "big, old theorems" (in particular Langlands' own archimedean correspondence), it all comes down to studying how involutions of a connected, reductive group vary under group homomorphisms. Here I will write down the key examples explicitly using matrices.

  • Number Theory Seminar

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