Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
6 August 2020
16:00
Vidit Nanda
Abstract

The signature of a path in Euclidean space resides in the tensor algebra of that space; it is obtained by systematic iterated integration of the components of the given path against one another. This straightforward definition conceals a host of deep theoretical properties and impressive practical consequences. In this talk I will describe the homotopical origins of path signatures, their subsequent application to stochastic analysis, and how they facilitate efficient machine learning in topological data analysis. This last bit is joint work with Ilya Chevyrev and Harald Oberhauser.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

8 October 2020
17:00

Further Information: 

When was the last time you read a grand statement, accompanied by a large number, and wondered whether it could really be true?

Statistics are vital in helping us tell stories – we see them in the papers, on social media, and we hear them used in everyday conversation – and yet we doubt them more than ever. But numbers, in the right hands, have the power to change the world for the better. Contrary to popular belief, good statistics are not a trick, although they are a kind of magic. Good statistics are like a telescope for an astronomer, or a microscope for a bacteriologist. If we are willing to let them, good statistics help us see things about the world around us and about ourselves.

Tim Harford is a senior columnist for the Financial Times, the presenter of Radio 4’s More or Less and is a visiting fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford. His books include The Fifty Things that Made the Modern Economy, Messy, and The Undercover Economist.

Watch live (no need to register):
https://twitter.com/OxUniMaths
https://www.facebook.com/OxfordMathematics/
https://livestream.com/oxuni/Harford

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

  • Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures
16 October 2020
14:00
Abstract

 Inherent fluctuations may play an important role in biological and chemical systems when the copy number of some chemical species is small. This talk will present the recent work on the stochastic modeling of reaction-diffusion processes in biochemical systems. First, I will introduce several stochastic models, which describe system features at different scales of interest. Then, model reduction and coarse-graining methods will be discussed to reduce model complexity. Next, I will show multiscale algorithms for stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion processes that couple different modeling schemes for better efficiency of the simulation. The algorithms apply to the systems whose domain is partitioned into two regions with a few molecules and a large number of molecules.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
28 October 2020
17:00

Further Information: 

Is there a secret formula for becoming rich? Or for happiness? Or for becoming popular? Or for self-confidence and good judgement? David Sumpter answer these questions with an emphatic ‘Yes!' All YOU need are The Ten Equations.

In this lecture David will reveal three of these: the confidence equation that helps gamblers know when they have a winning strategy; the influencer equation that shapes our social interactions; and the learning equation that YouTube used to get us addicted to their videos. A small group of mathematicians have used these equations to revolutionise our world. Now you can use them too to better manage your time and make money, have a more balanced approach to your popularity and even to become a nicer person.

David Sumpter is Professor of Applied Mathematics at the University of Uppsala, Sweden.

Watch live (no need to register):
https://twitter.com/OxUniMaths
https://www.facebook.com/OxfordMathematics/
https://livestream.com/oxuni/Sumpter2

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

  • Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures

Pages

Add to My Calendar