Forthcoming events in this series


Tue, 24 Jan 2023
14:00
L6

Highest weight theory and wall-crossing functors for reduced enveloping algebras

Matthew Westaway
(University of Birmingham)
Abstract

In the last few years, major advances have been made in our understanding of the representation theory of reductive algebraic groups over algebraically closed fields of positive characteristic. Four key tools which are central to this progress are highest weight theory, reduction to the principal block, wall-crossing functors, and tilting modules. When considering instead the representation theory of the Lie algebras of these algebraic groups, more subtleties arise. If we look at those modules whose p-character is in so-called standard Levi form we are able to recover the four tools mentioned above, but they have been less well-studied in this setting. In this talk, we will explore the similarities and differences which arise when employing these tools for the Lie algebras rather than the algebraic groups. This research is funded by a research fellowship from the Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851.

Tue, 17 Jan 2023
14:00
L6

Local Langlands correspondence and (stable) Bernstein center

Ju-Lee Kim
(MIT)
Abstract

We discuss the Local Langlands correspondence in connection with the Bernstein center and the Stable Bernstein center. We also give an example of stable Bernstein center as a stable essentially compact invariant distribution.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022
14:00
L6

Springer Fibres - Geometrical and Combinatorial Applications

Neil Saunders
(University of Greenwich)
Abstract

Fibres coming from the Springer resolution on the nilpotent cone are incredibly rich algebraic varieties that have many applications in representation theory and combinatorics. Though their geometry can be very difficult to describe in general, in type A at least, their irreducible components can be described using standard Young tableaux, and this can help describe their geometry in small dimensions. In this talk, I will report on recent and ongoing work with Lewis Topley and separately Daniele Rosso on geometrical and combinatorial applications of the classical ‘type A’ Springer fibres and the ‘exotic’ type C Springer fibres coming from Kato’s exotic Springer correspondence.

Tue, 22 Nov 2022
14:00
L6

Character sheaves and Khovanov-Rozansky homology

Kostiantyn Tolmachov
(Edinburgh University)
Abstract

Khovanov-Rozansky homology is a link invariant that categorifies the HOMFLY-PT polynomial. I will describe a geometric model for this invariant, living in the monodromic Hecke category. I will also explain how it allows to identify objects representing graded pieces of Khovanov-Rozansky homology, using a remarkable family of character sheaves. Based on joint works with Roman Bezrukavnikov.

Tue, 15 Nov 2022
14:00
L6

Higher Dimensional Lubin-Tate Formal Group Laws

James Taylor
(University of Oxford)
Abstract

In this talk we will present some work in progress generalising Lubin-Tate formal group laws to higher dimensions. There have been some other generalisations, but ours is different in that the ring over which the formal group law is defined changes as the dimension increases. We will state some conjectures about these formal group laws, including their relationship to the Drinfeld tower over the p-adic upper half plane, and provide supporting evidence for these conjectures.

Tue, 08 Nov 2022
14:00
L6

Generalising Vogan's conjecture across Schur-Weyl duality

Kieran Calvert
(University of Manchester)
Abstract

We outline Dirac cohomology for Lie algebras and Vogan’s conjecture. We then cover some basic material on Schur-Weyl duality and Arakawa-Suzuki functors. Finishing with current efforts and results on generalising Vogan’s conjecture to a Schur-Weyl duality setting. This would relate the centre of a Lie algebra with the centre of the relevant tantaliser algebra. We finish by considering a unitary module X and giving a bound on the action of the tantalizer algebra.

Tue, 01 Nov 2022
14:00
L6

Primitive ideals and W-algebras

Lewis Topley
(Bath University)
Abstract

A finite W-algebra is a gadget associated to each nilpotent orbit in a complex semisimple Lie algebra g. There is a functor from W-modules to a full subcategory of g-modules, known as Skryabin’s equivalence, and every primitive ideals of the enveloping algebra U(g) as the annihilator of a module obtained in this way. This gives a convenient way of organising together primitive ideals in terms of nilpotent orbits, and this approach has led to a resurgence of interest in some hard open problems which lay dormant for some 20 years. The primitive ideals of U(g) which come from one-dimensional representations of W-algebras are especially nice, and we shall call them Losev—Premet ideals. The goal of this talk is to explain my recent work which seeks to: (1) describe the structure of the space of the dimensional representations of a finite W-algebra and (2) classify the Losev—Premet ideals.

Tue, 25 Oct 2022
14:00
L6

Sums of squares in group algebras and vanishing of cohomology

Piotr Nowak
(Institute of Mathematics - Polish Academy of Sciences)
Abstract

I will discuss algebraic conditions that for a given group guarantee or characterize the vanishing of cohomology in a given degree with coefficients in any unitary representation. These conditions will be expressed in terms positivity of certain elements over group algebras, where positivity is meant as being a sum of hermitian squares. I will explain how conditions like this can be used to give computer-assisted proofs of vanishing of cohomology. 

Tue, 18 Oct 2022
14:00
L6

The local Langlands correspondence and unitary representations of GL(n)

Adam Brown
(Oxford University)
Abstract

Harish-Chandra's Lefschetz principle suggests that representations of real and p-adic split reductive groups are closely related, even though the methods used to study these groups are quite different. The local Langlands correspondence (as formulated by Vogan) indicates that these representation theoretic relationships stem from geometric relationships between real and p-adic Langlands parameters. In this talk we will discuss how the geometric structure of real and p-adic Langlands parameters lead to functorial relationships between representations of real and p-adic groups. I will describe work in progress which applies this functoriality to the study of unitary representations and signatures of invariant hermitian forms for GL(n). The main result expresses signatures of invariant hermitian forms on graded affine Hecke algebra modules in terms of signature characters of Harish-Chandra modules, which are computable via the unitary algorithm for real reductive groups by Adams-van Leeuwen-Trapa-Vogan.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022
14:00
L6

A decomposition of the category of l-modular representations of SL_n(F).

Peiyi Cui
(University of East Anglia)
Abstract

Let F be a p-adic field, and k an algebraically closed field of characteristic l different from p. In this talk, we will first give a category decomposition of Rep_k(SL_n(F)), the category of smooth k-representations of SL_n(F), with respect to the GL_n(F)-equivalent supercuspidal classes of SL_n(F), which is not always a block decomposition in general. We then give a block decomposition of the supercuspidal subcategory, by introducing a partition on each GL_n(F)-equivalent supercuspidal class through type theory, and we interpret this partition by the sense of l-blocks of finite groups. We give an example where a block of Rep_k(SL_2(F)) is defined with several SL_2(F)-equivalent supercuspidal classes, which is different from the case where l is zero. We end this talk by giving a prediction on the block decomposition of Rep_k(A) for a general p-adic group A.

Tue, 21 Jun 2022

14:00 - 15:00
L6

The orbit method and normality of closures of nilpotent orbits

Dan Barbasch
(Cornell University, USA)
Abstract

The work of Kraft-Procesi classifies closures of nilpotent orbits that are normal in the cases of classical complex Lie algebras. Subsequent work of Ranee Brylinsky combines this work with the Theta correspondence as defined by Howe to attach a representation of the corresponding complex group. It provides a quantization of the closure of a nilpotent orbit. In joint work with Daniel Wong, we carry out a detailed analysis of these representations viewed as (\g,K)-modules of the complex group viewed as a real group. One consequence is a "representation theoretic" proof of the classification of Kraft-Procesi.

Tue, 14 Jun 2022

14:00 - 15:00
L6

Invariable generation and totally deranged elements of simple groups

Scott Harper
(Bristol)
Abstract

By a classical theorem of Jordan, every faithful transitive action of a nontrivial finite group admits a derangement (an element with no fixed points). More recently, the existence of derangements with additional properties has attracted much attention, especially for primitive actions of almost simple groups. Surprisingly, there exist almost simple groups with elements that are derangements in every faithful primitive action; we say that these elements are totally deranged. I'll talk about ongoing work to classify the totally deranged elements of almost simple groups, and I'll mention how this solves a question of Garzoni about invariable generating sets for simple groups.

Tue, 07 Jun 2022

14:00 - 15:00
L6

How to restrict representations from a complex reductive group to a real form

Lucas Mason-Brown
((Oxford University))
Abstract

Let G(R) be the real points of a complex reductive algebraic group G. There are many difficult questions about admissible representations of real reductive groups which have (relatively) easy answers in the case of complex groups. Thus, it is natural to look for a relationship between representations of G and representations of G(R). In this talk, I will introduce a functor from admissible representations of G to admissible representations of G(R). This functor interacts nicely with many natural invariants, including infinitesimal character, associated variety, and restriction to a maximal compact subgroup, and it takes unipotent representations of G to unipotent representations of G(R).

Tue, 31 May 2022

14:00 - 15:00
L6

Towards 3d mirror symmetry for characteristic classes

Richard Rimanyi
(UNC Chapel Hill)
Abstract

In the first half of the talk, we will explore the concept of a characteristic class of a subvariety in a smooth ambient space. We will focus on the so-called stable envelope class,  in cohomology, K theory, and elliptic cohomology (due to Okoukov-Maulik-Aganagic). Stable envelopes have rich algebraic combinatorics, they are at the heart of enumerative geometry calculations, they show up in the study of associated (quantum) differential equations, and they are the main building blocks of constructing quantum group actions on the cohomology of moduli spaces.

In the second half of the talk, we will study a generalization of Nakajima quiver varieties called Cherkis’ bow varieties. These smooth spaces are endowed with familiar structures: holomorphic symplectic form, tautological bundles, torus action. Their algebraic combinatorics features a new powerful operation, the Hanany-Witten transition. Bow varieties come in natural pairs called 3d mirror symmetric pairs. A conjecture motivated by superstring theory predicts that stable envelopes on 3d mirror pairs are equal (in a sophisticated sense that involves switching equivariant and Kahler parameters). I will report on a work in progress, with T. Botta, to prove this conjecture.

Tue, 24 May 2022

15:30 - 16:30
L6

On centralizers in Azumaya domains

Thomas Bitoun
(University of Calgary)
Abstract

We prove a positive characteristic analogue of the classical result that the centralizer of a nonconstant differential operator in one variable is commutative. This leads to a new, short proof of that classical characteristic zero result, by reduction modulo p. This is joint work with Justin Desrochers available at https://arxiv.org/abs/2201.04606.

Tue, 24 May 2022

14:00 - 15:00
L5

Dirac index and associated cycles for Harish-Chandra modules

Salah Mehdi
(Université de Lorraine)
Abstract

Since their introduction in 1928 by Paul A. Dirac, Dirac operators have been playing essential roles in many areas of Physics and Mathematics. In particular, they provide powerful and efficient tools to clarify (and sometimes solve) important problems in representation theory of real Lie groups, p-adic groups or Hecke algebras, such as classification, unitarity and geometric realization. In this representation theoretic context, the Dirac index of a Harish-Chandra module is a virtual module induced by Vogan’s Dirac cohomology. Once we observe that Dirac index commutes with translation functors, we will associate a polynomial (on a Cartan subalgebra) with a coherent family of Harish-Chandra modules. Then we shall explain how this polynomial can be used to connect nilpotent orbits, associated cycles and the leading term of the Taylor expansion of the characters of Harish-Chandra modules. This is joint wok with P. Pandzic, D. Vogan and R. Zierau.
 

Tue, 17 May 2022

14:00 - 15:00
L6

Splitting fields of real irreducible representations of finite groups

Dmitrii Pasechnik
(Oxford)
Abstract

We show that any irreducible representation $\rho$ of a finite group $G$ of exponent $n$, realisable over $\mathbb R$, is realisable over the field $E$ of real cyclotomic numbers of order $n$, and describe an algorithmic procedure transforming a realisation of $\rho$ over $\mathbb Q(\zeta_n)$ to one over $E$.

Thu, 12 May 2022

15:30 - 16:30
L4

Representations of p-adic groups – with a twist

Jessica Fintzen
(Bonn University)
Abstract

The Langlands program is a far-reaching collection of conjectures that relate different areas of mathematics including number theory and representation theory. A fundamental problem on the representation theory side of the Langlands program is the construction of all (irreducible, smooth, complex or mod-$\ell$) representations of p-adic groups. I will provide an overview of our understanding of the representations of p-adic groups, with an emphasis on recent progress including joint work with Kaletha and Spice that introduces a twist to the story, and outline some applications.

Tue, 10 May 2022

14:00 - 15:00
L6

Equivariance in Deep Learning

Sheheryar Zaidi and Bryn Elesedy
(Oxford)
Abstract

One core aim of (supervised) machine learning is to approximate an unknown function given a dataset containing examples of input-output pairs. Real-world examples of such functions include the mapping from an image to its label or the mapping from a molecule to its energy. For a variety of such functions, while the precise mapping is unknown, we often have knowledge of its properties. For example, the label of an image may be invariant to rotations of the input image. Generally, such properties formally correspond to the function being equivariant to certain actions on its input and output spaces. This has led to much research on building equivariant function classes (aka neural networks). In this talk, we survey this growing field of equivariance in deep learning for a mathematical audience, motivating the need for equivariance, covering concrete examples of equivariant neural networks, and offering a learning theoretic perspective on the benefits of equivariance. 

Tue, 03 May 2022

14:00 - 15:00
L6

Equivariant line bundles with connection on the Drinfeld upper half-space

Amy Zhu
(Cambridge)
Abstract

Ardakov and Wadsley developed a theory of D-modules on rigid analytic spaces and established a Beilinson-Bernstein style localisation theorem for coadmissible modules over the locally analytic distribution algebra. Using this theory, they obtained admissible locally analytic representations of SL_2 by taking global sections of Drinfeld line bundles. In this talk, we will extend their techniques to SL_3 by studying the Drinfeld upper half-space \Omega^{(3)} of dimension 2.

Tue, 08 Mar 2022
14:00
L6

Localization in the smooth representation theory in natural characteristic of p-adic Lie groups

Peter Schneider
(Muenster)
Abstract

In commutative algebra localizing a ring and its modules is a fundamental technique. In the general case of a Grothendieck abelian category or even a triangulated category with small direct sums this is replaced by forming the quotient category by a localizing subcategory. Therefore the classification of these localizing subcategories becomes an important problem. I will begin by recalling the case of the (derived) module category of a commutative noetherian ring due to Gabriel and Hopkins/Neeman, respectively, in order to give an idea how such a classification can look like.

The case of interest in this talk is the derived category D(G) of smooth representation in characteristic p of a p-adic Lie group G. This is motivated by the emerging p-adic Langlands program. In joint work with C. Heyer we have some modest initial results if G is compact pro-p or abelian. which I will present.

Tue, 18 Jan 2022
14:00
Virtual

Dimensions of Iwasawa algebras and their representations

James Timmins
(Oxford)
Abstract

The Iwasawa algebra of a compact $p$-adic Lie group is fundamental to the study of the representations of the group. Understanding this representation theory is crucial in progress towards a (mod p) local Langlands correspondence. However, much remains unknown about Iwasawa algebras and their modules.

In this talk we'll aim to measure the size of the Iwasawa algebra and its representations. I'll explain the algebraic tools we use to do this - Krull dimension and canonical dimension - and survey previously known examples. Our main result is a new bound on these dimensions for the group $SL_2(O_F)$, where $F$ is a finite extension of the p-adic numbers. When $F$ is a quadratic extension, we find the Krull dimension is exactly 5, as predicted by a conjecture of Ardakov and Brown.

Tue, 30 Nov 2021
14:00
Virtual

Braids, Unipotent Representations, and Nonabelian Hodge Theory

Minh-Tâm Trinh
(MIT)
Abstract

A complex plane curve singularity gives rise to two objects: (1) a moduli space that representation theorists call an affine Springer fiber, and (2) a topological link up to isotopy. Roughly a decade ago, Oblomkov–Rasmussen–Shende conjectured a striking identity relating the homology of the affine Springer fiber to the so-called HOMFLYPT homology of the link. In unpublished writing, Shende speculated that it would follow from advances in nonabelian Hodge theory: the study of transcendental diffeomorphisms relating “Hitchin” and “Betti” moduli spaces. We make this dream precise by expressing HOMFLYPT homology in terms of the homology of a “Betti”-type space, which, we conjecture, deformation-retracts onto the affine Springer fiber. In doing so, we recast the whole story in terms of an arbitrary semisimple group. We give evidence for the nonabelian Hodge conjecture at the numerical level, using a mysterious formula that involves rational Cherednik algebras and the degrees of unipotent principal-series representations.

Tue, 16 Nov 2021
14:00
L3

Homology torsion growth in finitely presented pro-p groups

Nikolay Nikolov
(Oxford University)
Abstract

Let $G$ be a finitely presented residually finite group. We are interested in the growth of size of the torsion of $H^{ab}$ as a function of $|G:H|$ where $H$ ranges over normal subgroups of finite index in $G$. It is easy to see that this grows at most exponentially in terms of $|G:H|$. Of particular interest is the case when $G$ is an arithmetic hyperbolic 3-manifold group and $H$ ranges over its congruence subgroups. Proving exponential lower bounds on the torsion appears to be difficult and in this talk I will focus on the situation of finitely presented pro-$p$ groups.

In contrast with abstract groups I will show that in finitely presented pro-$p$ groups torsion in the abelianizations can grow arbitrarily fast. The examples are rather 'large' pro-$p$ groups, in particular they are virtually Golod-Shafarevich. When we restrict to $p$-adic analytic groups the torsion growth is at most polynomial.

Tue, 09 Nov 2021
14:00
L5

TBA

Marek Kaluba
(Karlsruher Institute für Technologie)
Abstract

In this leisure talk I will show how a sum of squares decomposition problem can be transformed to a problem of semi-definite optimization. Then the practicality of such reformulations will be discussed, illustrated by an explicit example of Artin's solutions to Hilberts 17th problem. Finally I will show how a numerical solution could be turned into a mathematically certified one, using the order structure on the cone of sums of squares.
The talk requires no pre-requisite knowledge of neither optimization or programming and only undergraduate mathematics.